View Thread: Rotary Boy


911GT2
Hey, I was just wondering what kind of shop that you have. Do you guys do repairs or mostly aftermarket fitting?

eric
Thats really funny cuz I just PM'd Rotary Boy about his shop. If you want you dont have to send me a PM response, you can just respond here.

SLP Addict
And also, whats teh name of it?

Rotary Boy
we do all of it.

technically we are just

"specializing in parts service repair and racing"

let me sum up a day at the shop

•work on a minivan or two(put new brakes on, or work on transmition woes)
•fix a random family box(maybe collision repair, maybe basic tune up)
•install a new clutch on somthing, fix some idiot move on someone elses part(I swear some people are dumb)
and then we have the:
•"I think my alternators bad"
•"yeah...uhhhh my car won't start... can you fix it?"
•"dude can you put a cat back on this shit!!!???"
•"can you prep this little guy so that it will be both legal and competitive in E-stock? cool dude"
•"uhhhh I tryed to put new heads on my '86 firebird, and I think i did somthing wrong, can you fix everything I screwed up?"


and then we also have the task of occaisionally hauling some dead car to our shop to bring it back to life. we do a good deal of aftermarket installs too, alot of it centered around the boy-racer crowd(plenty of cat back, CAI, and that sort of thing) stuff like that. but we also get a fair amount of business amoung those who have alittle more idea of what they are doing but don't have the materials to do it themselves (a guy not to long ago had a 2G Rx-7 he was trying to fix up, so he had us do the work that he didn't have the facilities for). but the real key that makes the place so great is that we usually have the fundage to finance some really interesting projects. Althought to have the money to have fun we have to put up with alot of stuff that is damn boring and tedious.

911GT2
So by looking at your stable I'd assume it's quite successful?

eric
Are you the owner of the shop?

Rotary Boy
Originally posted by SLP Addict
And also, whats teh name of it?

Absolute automotive


eric rxb
Are you the owner of the shop?

a partner

k6kicker
so what do you think has been the biggest bitch to work on yet? I pray to god you haven't had to deal with any eletrical issues with any Z32's (if you dont know what that is, stand up and kick yourself in the pants..and no its not a chevy)...Saying it is an electrical labyrinth is a gross understatement :banghead:

SkylineUSA
k6,

Thats a good question. I was thinking that myself.

Rotary Boy
Originally posted by k6kicker
so what do you think has been the biggest bitch to work on yet? I pray to god you haven't had to deal with any eletrical issues with any Z32's (if you dont know what that is, stand up and kick yourself in the pants..and no its not a chevy)...Saying it is an electrical labyrinth is a gross understatement :banghead:

god nissan can build a car in a way so that you don't ever want to have to work on one. Z32's and SE-R spec V's are bitches in more ways than one. saabs can be a PITA. an NSU spyder probably wins the prise for biggest bitch to work on just becuase everything under the hood is sharp, the upside is I have only ever had to work on one NSU spyder. MY old edsel was a hassle sometimes but thats just becuase the door liked to fall off. VW golf TDI's can carry some agrivating electrical baggage. those are the ones off the top of my head.

masestylez
Working on an S10 with a bigger motor stuffed under the hood was a large bitch for me and my friends, especcially when the wiring harness has been lengthened so much it's almost like the engine got caught in a sticky black spider web. Argh that sucked.

87 Supra Turbo
Let's do the reverse, how about easiest cars to work on? The easiest thing I've ever worked on was my very first car, a 2.3L Mustang. So much room in the engine bay you could almost stand inside of it with the engine installed.

masestylez
I first learned engine maitenance on a rotary and there is a lot of room in a 2nd gen RX-7 under the bonnet so it's very easy for me to do anything on it. As for a piston-based car, I'd say an old Land Cruiser was pretty easy or my 1977 Toyota 4x4.

eric
I was working on a buddy's old ford pickup, dont even know what model, but there was a vast amount of room under the hood.

My wrangler is pretty easy to work on. The dashboard only takes 6 screw's to get it off.

Rotary Boy
old F-150's with the straigt 6 had enough room for you that if you took off the hood you could sit next to the motor and work on it.